ToDo/NewDo Downloadable List for Creative Projects

ToDo/NewDo Downloadable List for Creative Projects

A ToDo/NewDo list one can use to create a listing of items to complete.

Creativity vs. Corona Virus Creative Challenge
Included below are two forms which you can download to make lists of your creative projects that you plan to tackle during this time of uncertainty with the Corona Virus. We might be confined to our homes, but we are not without creative juices that need to be exercised.

There are two forms:

This first form is an editable PDF so you can fill out your ToDo and ReDo items on your computer and save them.

https://www.cochenille.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/03/ToDoNewDo_editable.pdf

This form is a two-up printable PDF so you can print out form.

https://www.cochenille.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/03/ToDoNewDo_2up-1.pdf

Garment Designer Top: African Influence

Recently, I oversaw a project at Mesa College in San Diego, which involved a partnership between our Fashion students, the Mesa African Art collection, and Visions Art Museum in San Diego Liberty Station.

There were several aspects to the project, but the final activity was a fashion show featuring African-influenced clothing. Many of the garments came from my Textile Design students in my Fall semester class. I decided that I too needed to get involved, and so embarked on two different design projects. In this blog, I’ll share the first with you.

My source of inspiration was a piece of carved wood. Sad to say, I don’t know future details, only that I took the photo while we were visiting the artifact collection.

Since the original wood piece was rounded, I had to use Photoshop to straighten it out a bit.

Photo of Inspiration: from a piece of carved wood

I wanted the garment to be relatively simple, free of internal structural lines, so that the wood imagery would be seen as it was designed.

Below is the pattern I settled on. This was taken from a top I own that I purchased in Japan.

The pattern created in Garment Designer pattern software

In Garment Designer, I set the page size to be the size of the pattern, and then saved the pattern as a PDF.

Then.. on to Photoshop.

There I opened the large pattern pieces (each on a separate page), and I brought them together into one document. The width of this document was set up to the width of the fabric I wanted to print on (which was a polyester chiffon, 58” wide).

Pattern pieces laid into Photoshop

Working between the imagery document and the Garment Designer pattern document, I used Selection tools, and copy/paste to bring the images in.  I orchestrated a border effect on the bottom and stretched the imagery to fill the space above. You can see the results below.

Garment Designer pattern in Photoshop, with the imagery engineered into place

Once I had the layout ready, I threw in some variations of the pattern off to the side of each pattern piece, so I would have fabric to trim the neckline and armholes during the sewing process.

Extra imagery is added to the file to provide trim fabric

The next step was to upload to Spoonflower in North Carolina.

The order process on Spoonflower, digital printing of fabric

And then to wait until the fabric arrived, which of course was only a few days before the fashion show… so time to sew!!

One of the beautiful things about engineered design, is that you don’t ever print a paper pattern. Instead, your fabric arrives with the garment piece all laid out and ready to cut. Here is my fabric just before cutting.

Fabric ready to be cut. Note how similar this is to a cookie cutter approach!

I used some of the trim areas to make the binding for the neckline and armholes. These were cut on the bias and applied to finish the edges. The most challenging part of the construction was sewing chiffon on a bias grain. I simply serged the edge, pressed it under and top stitched it in place, attempting to have minimal handling.

The garment was complete, and ready for the show.

See how the back cut is different from the front.
The final garment, yea!

I only have one shot from the show, a rear-view, but as you can see, it was modelled.

Garment being modeled at the Fashion Show at Visions Art Museum in San Diego, CA

So, another ‘done’ project. I love to have a motivator (such as a fashion show) which gives me the reason to move ‘To Do’ items up the list of priorities.

And I course, I love Garment Designer. It is such a creative tool; I can do most anything with it and in very short order, and of course, because it knows my body measurements, I never have to alter. Can life get any better?

Oh My Stars, A Free Garment Designer Pattern!

Designing a Star on Garment Designer

Cochenille has many crafters using the Garment Designer program, so I thought I’d share a quick look at my craft project. Since we have a webinar later this month about Working with the Extras Menu, I thought I could show it being used in action! I will include the Garment Designer Pattern file as well as a half-scaled .pdf at the end of this post.

Now many of you may have noticed Garment Designer does not have stars included in the Style Sets, but if you’ve seen a few of our other posts, you know that we can modify these styles quite a bit simply by moving points around. My Fourth of July craft challenge to myself was to modify a style in Garment Designer into a star.

In order to draft a star I first needed to find any style with 10 points and all straight segments. Having curved segments would work as well, but it would not be ideal since I would also have to adjust the bezier curve handles. For this endeavor, I looked towards our collars, under the extras menu. The Collar Stand: Mandarin 1 collar to be exact.

You can find this by going to your Extras Menu, then selecting Joined at Back under the collar title (which will always be greyed out because it is just a title):

In the time-lapsed video for this project I had hidden my other pieces so I only had my ‘extras’ showing. You can choose which pieces are shown, and how they are displayed (joined, adjacent, independent) by going to Display > Pieces:

Allow me give you a general overview of what I did. There were a few times I got my math wrong so I would have to go back and fix points, you’ll notice me go ‘backwards’ pretty often and recheck measurements, then cross-check again.First I just moved the points into the general shape of a star. Then after calculating what my dimensions should be, I turned on the dimensions on my pattern to assist me (Display > Show Dimensions). I also used my info bar to measure between points or to measure segment.

If you are not familiar with selecting and measuring segments, read Chapter 3 in the Manual.

No, really, go read it. Learning how to select and measure segments and points is a must when working in Garment Designer.

Windows Users can find their Manual on their Desktop or by going to their C: Drive > Garment Designer folder. Mac users can find the Garment Designer folder located in Applications.

Info Bar Tip: Just because there is not a segment between two points does not mean you cannot measure the height or width between those two points. Select the two points you want to measure (you may have to suppress symmetry temporarily if it is turned on) then look at your info bar in the lower left corner of your screen for the information:

I planned on using this star template to make patriotic bunting out of glitter foam or felt pieces next time I run to the craft store. I will use the entire semi-circle to cut out the red. Then layer the white and blue pieces on top.

After completing the star I visited my Extras Menu again to pick a shape. I chose a ‘Round Shape’ and then moved the uppermost point level with the two points at the sides to make a semicircle.

To mark the other semicircles within my shape I used the facing option. I selected the circular outer segments then went to Additions > Add Facing.

I’ve included the file below if you’d like to take a peek, but try not to change any of the styles. You can also scale the display to print out a larger size or smaller sizes.

Cochenille Star Pattern and Printout

Enjoy your day and happy crafting!

Garment Designer: Copying Pattern Dimensions from Pinterest

Garment Designer: Copying Pattern Dimensions from Pinterest

Hello All!

Today we wanted to explore how one can use dimensions to copy a pattern. For the video we used a reference photo from Pinterest, but you can use the same process from any schematic you create, such as from a paper pattern or a garment itself.

Pinterest is a great source of design inspiration and patterning tips, as undoubtedly many of our creative users already know. One of my favorite pins to come across are the pattern analysis pins. There is usually a nice photo of a finished garment as well as a pattern with dimensions listed. These pictures are a great starting point if you’d like to pattern the garment but don’t really know what the flat pattern shape is or what the measurements are.

If you’ve attended any of our Garment Designer Webinars where we show you how to copy a Garment, the process is going to be feel very familiar. Cochenille rotates through our live webinars every month, but we do have some downloadable webinar videos that can be purchased at our web store.

Please enjoy the video and if you happen to be inspired to try your own project using this method, send us your photos! We will add it to this post so other readers can see.

info@cochenille.com

Have a Crafty Halloween!

 

Cochenille would like to wish everyone a Happy Halloween! We hope that you were able to use our software to create some spooktacular projects!

If you would like to share any of your Halloween projects that you made using our software, please feel free to submit them to info@cochenille.com to be featured on our Creative With Cochenille blog!

This Halloween I will be looking forward to sewing up a Harry Potter robe pattern I made using Garment Designer as I await trick-or-treaters!For our digital “treat” please feel free to download the Stitch Painter file or .pdf of Frankenstein’s monster made using the Full Color Import module!

Frankie Stitch Painter File

Frankie PDF

As for “tricks”, here is how I made the Stitch Painter file….

I took the image into photoshop and viewed the file size information so that I would know how to setup my document in Stitch Painter. My image was 9″ x 9″, so I knew when I went into Stitch Painter I could use a 100 x 100 unit sized document and the proportions wouldn’t be skewed since the ratios were the same.

I then changed some of my contrast settings and colorized the image in Photoshop:

Then it was as simple as selecting the image in Photoshop and copying it to my clipboard (Keyboard shortcut on mac: Cmd + C)

I then opened a new 100×100 Unit document in Stitch Painter and made sure my grid size was an even proportion (I chose 9 x 9)

Using the Full Color Import Module, I selected my entire document (100x100units) and pasted the image (Keyboard shortcut on Mac: Cmd + V)

Then I clicked and held over the live selection and chose how many colors I wanted to reduce it to. I tried various selections and reduction algorithms to see which one I liked best. 

The great thing about the Full Color Import module, is that I can clean up my palette to make it easier to start reducing my colors even more.

A useful Stitch Painter trick for reducing colors is to find where a color is used in a document by clicking on it in the Palette panel to select it, and then pressing and holding the ʻfʼ key on the keyboard. The chosen color will flash on the screen as long as the ʻfʼ key is held down(picture below). One can then find colors near the value of the previously flashing palette swatch by using the eyedropper tool.

To combine the two colors click on the first color, then press and hold down the Cmd Key (Mac) or Ctrl key (Windows) while you drag the first color over the second color in the palette. The First color selected will then become the second color.

Stitch Painter also allows the combination of two color selections to create a new averaged color. Simply click on the first color, press and hold down the Cmd + Opt key (Mac) or the Ctrl + Alt (Windows) as you drag the first color over the second color in the palette.

I reduced the colors in my image to a more manageable amount of colors. If I didn’t like how a combination turned out, I just undid my previous action and tried a new color combination (Cmd + Z on Mac or Edit > Undo)

Thank you for Trick or Treating with us today! We look forward to seeing your Halloween projects!

 

 

 

Theme: Overlay by Kaira © Cochenille Design Studio 2019