Cochenille Design Studio

Oh My Stars, A Free Garment Designer Pattern!

Designing a Star on Garment Designer

Cochenille has many crafters using the Garment Designer program, so I thought I’d share a quick look at my craft project. Since we have a webinar later this month about Working with the Extras Menu, I thought I could show it being used in action! I will include the Garment Designer Pattern file as well as a half-scaled .pdf at the end of this post.

Now many of you may have noticed Garment Designer does not have stars included in the Style Sets, but if you’ve seen a few of our other posts, you know that we can modify these styles quite a bit simply by moving points around. My Fourth of July craft challenge to myself was to modify a style in Garment Designer into a star.

In order to draft a star I first needed to find any style with 10 points and all straight segments. Having curved segments would work as well, but it would not be ideal since I would also have to adjust the bezier curve handles. For this endeavor, I looked towards our collars, under the extras menu. The Collar Stand: Mandarin 1 collar to be exact.

You can find this by going to your Extras Menu, then selecting Joined at Back under the collar title (which will always be greyed out because it is just a title):

In the time-lapsed video for this project I had hidden my other pieces so I only had my ‘extras’ showing. You can choose which pieces are shown, and how they are displayed (joined, adjacent, independent) by going to Display > Pieces:

Allow me give you a general overview of what I did. There were a few times I got my math wrong so I would have to go back and fix points, you’ll notice me go ‘backwards’ pretty often and recheck measurements, then cross-check again.First I just moved the points into the general shape of a star. Then after calculating what my dimensions should be, I turned on the dimensions on my pattern to assist me (Display > Show Dimensions). I also used my info bar to measure between points or to measure segment.

If you are not familiar with selecting and measuring segments, read Chapter 3 in the Manual.

No, really, go read it. Learning how to select and measure segments and points is a must when working in Garment Designer.

Windows Users can find their Manual on their Desktop or by going to their C: Drive > Garment Designer folder. Mac users can find the Garment Designer folder located in Applications.

Info Bar Tip: Just because there is not a segment between two points does not mean you cannot measure the height or width between those two points. Select the two points you want to measure (you may have to suppress symmetry temporarily if it is turned on) then look at your info bar in the lower left corner of your screen for the information:

I planned on using this star template to make patriotic bunting out of glitter foam or felt pieces next time I run to the craft store. I will use the entire semi-circle to cut out the red. Then layer the white and blue pieces on top.

After completing the star I visited my Extras Menu again to pick a shape. I chose a ‘Round Shape’ and then moved the uppermost point level with the two points at the sides to make a semicircle.

To mark the other semicircles within my shape I used the facing option. I selected the circular outer segments then went to Additions > Add Facing.

I’ve included the file below if you’d like to take a peek, but try not to change any of the styles. You can also scale the display to print out a larger size or smaller sizes.

Cochenille Star Pattern and Printout

Enjoy your day and happy crafting!

Garment Designer: Copying Pattern Dimensions from Pinterest

Garment Designer: Copying Pattern Dimensions from Pinterest

Hello All!

Today we wanted to explore how one can use dimensions to copy a pattern. For the video we used a reference photo from Pinterest, but you can use the same process from any schematic you create, such as from a paper pattern or a garment itself.

Pinterest is a great source of design inspiration and patterning tips, as undoubtedly many of our creative users already know. One of my favorite pins to come across are the pattern analysis pins. There is usually a nice photo of a finished garment as well as a pattern with dimensions listed. These pictures are a great starting point if you’d like to pattern the garment but don’t really know what the flat pattern shape is or what the measurements are.

If you’ve attended any of our Garment Designer Webinars where we show you how to copy a Garment, the process is going to be feel very familiar. Cochenille rotates through our live webinars every month, but we do have some downloadable webinar videos that can be purchased at our web store.

Please enjoy the video and if you happen to be inspired to try your own project using this method, send us your photos! We will add it to this post so other readers can see.

info@cochenille.com

Have a Crafty Halloween!

 

Cochenille would like to wish everyone a Happy Halloween! We hope that you were able to use our software to create some spooktacular projects!

If you would like to share any of your Halloween projects that you made using our software, please feel free to submit them to info@cochenille.com to be featured on our Creative With Cochenille blog!

This Halloween I will be looking forward to sewing up a Harry Potter robe pattern I made using Garment Designer as I await trick-or-treaters!For our digital “treat” please feel free to download the Stitch Painter file or .pdf of Frankenstein’s monster made using the Full Color Import module!

Frankie Stitch Painter File

Frankie PDF

As for “tricks”, here is how I made the Stitch Painter file….

I took the image into photoshop and viewed the file size information so that I would know how to setup my document in Stitch Painter. My image was 9″ x 9″, so I knew when I went into Stitch Painter I could use a 100 x 100 unit sized document and the proportions wouldn’t be skewed since the ratios were the same.

I then changed some of my contrast settings and colorized the image in Photoshop:

Then it was as simple as selecting the image in Photoshop and copying it to my clipboard (Keyboard shortcut on mac: Cmd + C)

I then opened a new 100×100 Unit document in Stitch Painter and made sure my grid size was an even proportion (I chose 9 x 9)

Using the Full Color Import Module, I selected my entire document (100x100units) and pasted the image (Keyboard shortcut on Mac: Cmd + V)

Then I clicked and held over the live selection and chose how many colors I wanted to reduce it to. I tried various selections and reduction algorithms to see which one I liked best. 

The great thing about the Full Color Import module, is that I can clean up my palette to make it easier to start reducing my colors even more.

A useful Stitch Painter trick for reducing colors is to find where a color is used in a document by clicking on it in the Palette panel to select it, and then pressing and holding the ʻfʼ key on the keyboard. The chosen color will flash on the screen as long as the ʻfʼ key is held down(picture below). One can then find colors near the value of the previously flashing palette swatch by using the eyedropper tool.

To combine the two colors click on the first color, then press and hold down the Cmd Key (Mac) or Ctrl key (Windows) while you drag the first color over the second color in the palette. The First color selected will then become the second color.

Stitch Painter also allows the combination of two color selections to create a new averaged color. Simply click on the first color, press and hold down the Cmd + Opt key (Mac) or the Ctrl + Alt (Windows) as you drag the first color over the second color in the palette.

I reduced the colors in my image to a more manageable amount of colors. If I didn’t like how a combination turned out, I just undid my previous action and tried a new color combination (Cmd + Z on Mac or Edit > Undo)

Thank you for Trick or Treating with us today! We look forward to seeing your Halloween projects!

 

 

 

Basket Case: The Play-it-safe Case for Your Picnic Plates!

Patterning Using Garment Designer:

Accessory Challenge

This month’s Design Challenge is piggybacking off my last blog post about Fanny Packs. I had so much fun trying to create a new pattern using an existing Style Set that I thought other people would like to give it a try as well. Transforming the Flared Skirt Style Set into the Fanny Pack Pattern was a refreshing project to get me thinking outside of the box on what Garment Designer can do for me.

Challenge yourself with this fun project and try to think of a simple accessory you would like to make, then create it using Garment Designer! Make a purse, clutch, laptop case, etc. using a Garment Designer Style Set.

Summer is here! So for my next Style Set prest-o chang-o project I thought I would pattern this handy and dandy picnic plate case that Susan picked up during her travels to Italy:

After taking some measurements I drew out a schematic.

You can also download this and print it as a reference. The .PDF does not have any seam allowances added.

Picnic Basket CDS.pdf

Now that I had my schematic, I had to shop for a Style Set to suit my needs.

  • I knew I didn’t want to be fussing with curves so I wanted all straight lines in the style set.
  • I also knew I was going to pattern this as cut on the fold because a) I don’t like wasting paper b) it is a symmetrical pattern so I could.

Looking at half of my pattern, I counted how many points I would need for the pattern:

I picked the menu options that would give me straight lines: Top with a V-Neck and a Sleeve Cap.

I clicked once on the inside of the pattern to highlight my points, counted 6 (not including my center front) and I was good to go!

From here it was just a matter of moving the 6 points around until I was able to recreate my schematic.

You can see my center front is now the ‘cut on fold’ of my project.

I made a pattern for my handles by going to Extras > Shape 1 then adjusting the measurements.

*Note about the Extras menu: The titles for the Extras options will display as greyed out, simply select the desired option below the titles to add a extra.

Here is my Garment Designer pattern for any users that would like to take a look:

Picnic Plate Carrier.gds

I printed out the .PDF and taped it together for reference.

The easiest way to make this would be out of 4-5mm thick felt like the original. However, finding a felt the width of the pattern in that thickness would have made this pricier than I would have liked.

I chose instead to use a thick chenille dot fabric and batting to pad the case. I did not have fusible batting available to me at the time, so I used regular batting and sandwiched it between the layers.

I found four buttons to sew on for the closures and also used buttonhole thread to attach them.

As always, it is important to make sure you have any and all notches marked.

I marked the notches for my handles about 3″ apart.

I also made sure to mark all four of my ‘snip’ lines as shown in the .PDF.

I will be be narrowly sewing around this line with a butthole stitch (.5 Stitch Length and width at 2 on my sewing machine) so that I can snip it and turn without any raw edges.

To make the handles, I cut 4 handle pieces and sewed them right sides together.

Then I turned them with my loop turner and sewed edge-stitched them together from the middle about 4 inches.

I pinned my handles at the notch marks and then sandwiched them between the right sides of my fabric.

I pinned my fabric right sides together with the batting touching the wrong side of the fabric.

I sewed around the edges leaving about a 4″ opening on one side so that I could turn it inside out. I also made sure to do a button stitch around the ‘snip’ lines as I went around.

Clipped and trimmed the corners before turning everything using the opening I left, then edge-stitched the perimeter to close.

Optonal: I had a box lying around so I cut a 12″ x 12″ piece, rolled it up slightly and stuck it inside before closing so that I had some stiffness at the bottom of the carrier.

Update: Cochenille User Diane had a very good suggestion(see comments below) to make this machine washable. She suggests using a piece of plastic canvas or a plastic report cover or notebook divider so that you can add stiffness to the pattern.

Then it was time to fold it on up!

I marked the 1.5″ mark that I had mapped out on my PDF for folding on all four corners, folded the corner down and started tacking through all the layers with my buttonhole thread. Then before I finished tacking, I added a button to cover up the tack mark.

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Another accessory complete! Good luck on your design challenge and please share them with us at info@cochenille.com

 

April Cochenille Design Challenge

April Cochenille Design Challenge

Our April Cochenille Design Challenge will help you keep track of your USB Hasp key! USB Hasp keys are small, easy to tuck away and sometimes feel like they have chameleon-like qualities. Poor little thing; we think she just needs some ‘glam’

For April’s Cochenille Design Challenge let’s dress it up! We invite you to make a keychain that will make your HASP key strut her stuff. She will stand out, so you won’t be able to miss her (or him).

April Key Fob Keychain Challenge: Fab Your Key Fob

We know Cochenille software users are creative, so let’s make our key fobs fabulously fun!

Let your creativity shine so bright you cannot miss it. Make it flashy, furry, fun, fluorescent…anything you would like, but most importantly UNFORGETTABLE.

Submit images of your easy-to-find key fob to info@cochenille.com and be entered to win a gift certificate for Cochenille product. We will post all the entries and a winner will be chosen by May 5th.

We don’t require that you use our software to design your keychain, but kudos to those that do!

If you have a story to go along with your keychain, please feel free to share it with us.

We look forward to seeing your submissions. As the month progresses you can see our staff entries at: http://www.cochenille.com/cochenilleblog/

Happy Crafting from Cochenille!

info@cochenille.com

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