Cochenille Design Studio

Have a Crafty Halloween!

 

Cochenille would like to wish everyone a Happy Halloween! We hope that you were able to use our software to create some spooktacular projects!

If you would like to share any of your Halloween projects that you made using our software, please feel free to submit them to info@cochenille.com to be featured on our Creative With Cochenille blog!

This Halloween I will be looking forward to sewing up a Harry Potter robe pattern I made using Garment Designer as I await trick-or-treaters!For our digital “treat” please feel free to download the Stitch Painter file or .pdf of Frankenstein’s monster made using the Full Color Import module!

Frankie Stitch Painter File

Frankie PDF

As for “tricks”, here is how I made the Stitch Painter file….

I took the image into photoshop and viewed the file size information so that I would know how to setup my document in Stitch Painter. My image was 9″ x 9″, so I knew when I went into Stitch Painter I could use a 100 x 100 unit sized document and the proportions wouldn’t be skewed since the ratios were the same.

I then changed some of my contrast settings and colorized the image in Photoshop:

Then it was as simple as selecting the image in Photoshop and copying it to my clipboard (Keyboard shortcut on mac: Cmd + C)

I then opened a new 100×100 Unit document in Stitch Painter and made sure my grid size was an even proportion (I chose 9 x 9)

Using the Full Color Import Module, I selected my entire document (100x100units) and pasted the image (Keyboard shortcut on Mac: Cmd + V)

Then I clicked and held over the live selection and chose how many colors I wanted to reduce it to. I tried various selections and reduction algorithms to see which one I liked best. 

The great thing about the Full Color Import module, is that I can clean up my palette to make it easier to start reducing my colors even more.

A useful Stitch Painter trick for reducing colors is to find where a color is used in a document by clicking on it in the Palette panel to select it, and then pressing and holding the ʻfʼ key on the keyboard. The chosen color will flash on the screen as long as the ʻfʼ key is held down(picture below). One can then find colors near the value of the previously flashing palette swatch by using the eyedropper tool.

To combine the two colors click on the first color, then press and hold down the Cmd Key (Mac) or Ctrl key (Windows) while you drag the first color over the second color in the palette. The First color selected will then become the second color.

Stitch Painter also allows the combination of two color selections to create a new averaged color. Simply click on the first color, press and hold down the Cmd + Opt key (Mac) or the Ctrl + Alt (Windows) as you drag the first color over the second color in the palette.

I reduced the colors in my image to a more manageable amount of colors. If I didn’t like how a combination turned out, I just undid my previous action and tried a new color combination (Cmd + Z on Mac or Edit > Undo)

Thank you for Trick or Treating with us today! We look forward to seeing your Halloween projects!

 

 

 

How to Read a Ruler

https://www.amazon.com/Westcott-18-Inch-Beveled-Transparent-B-85/dp/B000V59R8K

How To Read a Ruler

Learning how to read a ruler is a patterning must and to make it just a bit easier for our users we would like to share our own reference handout that is now on Pinterest!

Feel free to print it out and reference it while patterning or measuring!

Download the .pdf:

RulerHandout.pdf

Pinterest has made saving and sharing ideas, projects, how to’s and more fantastically easy & fun. Cochenille Design Studio would love to share what we have been pinning!

Find us on Pinterest at https://www.pinterest.com/cochenilleDS/boards/ 

View our Garment Designer & Stitch Painter projects and be sure to share yours with us!

Until next time, Happy Crafting!

 

 

Garment Designer: Extra Extras! Read all about it!

Patterning Using Garment Designer: Extra Extras! Read all about it!

Hello All!

I’ve been meaning to post some more details on how I made this fun top on Garment Designer using the Extras menu on Garment Designer.

I started off with a waist length contoured top with a boat neck and a bust dart then modified the pattern points.


I moved my dart down to make a french dart.

I brought the front neckline down a bit, shortened the sleeve and tried to get as little ease as possible since I wanted it to be pretty fitted for my knit fabric.

I also chose to use the Dressmaking Armhole since this style allows the front armhole to swing in slightly in the front, make a more comfortable fit for a top like this.

Now the fun part…adding the extras!

To add a collar, I went to the Extras menu and selected ‘Joined at Back‘.

This presented me with my collar options:

I wanted a full stand and used the band option. I made my band about 3″ tall on the pattern, as I wold be folding it in half for a 1- 1/2″ tall collar.

Then I added my sleeve and peplum edgings from the Extras menu to add some flounces.

If you take a look at my sleeve edging, you will see I chose the longest option I could, which was 6″… but I wanted 8″.

I could have added a 2″ custom seam allowance to the sleeve edging (Additions > Custom Sleeve Allowance or keyboard shortcut ⌘+K).

Instead I chose to highlight the edge I wanted to extend, then added a 2″ extension (Additions > Add Extension)

I chose to attach at a 1:1 ratio so that the seam didn’t get too thick. I then added a 3:1 ratio for maximum flare.I did the same thing for my peplum by adding an edging to the hem of the shirt. I kept it at 6″ but elongated the back to 8″ and then played with the points to smooth the transition of the hem at the sides.

I added my seam allowances (1/4″ since I was using a knit fabric and will be using my serger) and printed it all out.

Cut it out of my fashion fabric…

Then began the sewing!

Since I just had to make this out of a white knit, I thought I would line the bodice with white for modesty.

I chose to use a white interlock fabric.

I will say in advance that the way I sewed this top up isn’t the only  way, just the way I chose to order my steps as I went.

I wanted to have a clean seam at the neckline so my first step was to sew the shoulder seams of my fashion fabric then separately I sewed the shoulder seams of my lining.

I also made sure to mark my darts and really carefully snip out my notches. Normally to mark notches on a 1/4 seam I would cut outward triangles but this was a quick project so I went with tiny snips.

I sewed the center back of the collar together, folded it at the fold line and then made a long basting stitch in the seam allowance.I then basted the collar, right sides together, to the fashion fabric. 

Then I pinned my lining on, sandwiching the collar between the self fabric and the lining, with my finished seams facing inwards towards each other.


I sewed the lining, collar and self fabric together then turned… No raw edge on the collar anymore!

I had marked my darts earlier and decided to sew them together by basting the pieces together, then sewing the dart closed.

Then I made a basting stitch around all the remaining edges

Instead of closing the side seam and setting the sleeves into the armscye, I sewed them in flat and left the side seam open.

I also added the sleeve edging at this point. I could have added the peplum too, but decided for no particular reason to leave it until last.

The last steps were sewing the side seam and sleeves together and adding the peplum, then I was done!

Here is the final top along with some Garment Designer patterned pants!

There are more extras to explore on Garment Designer…Until next time, happy crafting!

Have Happy 4th of July! Free Captain America Shield Gridded Design

We at Cochenille Design Studio hope that everyone is enjoying their 4th of July! Please feel free 😉 to download the Captain America Shield Cross-Stitch Pattern made using Cochenille Design Studio’s Stitch Painter software with the FCI Plug-in.

.PDF files are at the end of the post. Here is a quick overview of how I made it:

I found the logo using a google image search from http://www.logospike.com/captain-america-logo-284/

Then I opened it up in Preview and copied it into my clipboard

Opened up a new Stitch Painter Document and set my document size as 100 x 100 (file > Set Document Size).

Set my Grid Size to 10 x 10 (Layout > Grid)

Used my Marquee Tool and selected 80×80

Then pasted my image (cmd+v on mac) into Stitch Painter, Clicked and held down on the image until my Full Color Import options showed ( I chose 4 colors)

I then combined a few stray colors and cleaned up my palette.

If you want Color 1 to become Color 2, you will click on the first color, then press and hold down the Cmd Key (Mac) or Ctrl key (Windows) while you drag the first color over the second color in the palette.

Then I had the gridded design that I will be using for a Cross-Stitch pattern.

No grid view option:I saved a few .pdf versions and included them below. Have a Happy 4th of July!

Captain America Shield – Color

Captain America Shield Full Size

Captain America Shield-Symbols

Stitch Painter file:

Captain America Shield.stch

 

 

 

 

 

 

Basket Case: The Play-it-safe Case for Your Picnic Plates!

Patterning Using Garment Designer:

Accessory Challenge

This month’s Design Challenge is piggybacking off my last blog post about Fanny Packs. I had so much fun trying to create a new pattern using an existing Style Set that I thought other people would like to give it a try as well. Transforming the Flared Skirt Style Set into the Fanny Pack Pattern was a refreshing project to get me thinking outside of the box on what Garment Designer can do for me.

Challenge yourself with this fun project and try to think of a simple accessory you would like to make, then create it using Garment Designer! Make a purse, clutch, laptop case, etc. using a Garment Designer Style Set.

Summer is here! So for my next Style Set prest-o chang-o project I thought I would pattern this handy and dandy picnic plate case that Susan picked up during her travels to Italy:

After taking some measurements I drew out a schematic.

You can also download this and print it as a reference. The .PDF does not have any seam allowances added.

Picnic Basket CDS.pdf

Now that I had my schematic, I had to shop for a Style Set to suit my needs.

  • I knew I didn’t want to be fussing with curves so I wanted all straight lines in the style set.
  • I also knew I was going to pattern this as cut on the fold because a) I don’t like wasting paper b) it is a symmetrical pattern so I could.

Looking at half of my pattern, I counted how many points I would need for the pattern:

I picked the menu options that would give me straight lines: Top with a V-Neck and a Sleeve Cap.

I clicked once on the inside of the pattern to highlight my points, counted 6 (not including my center front) and I was good to go!

From here it was just a matter of moving the 6 points around until I was able to recreate my schematic.

You can see my center front is now the ‘cut on fold’ of my project.

I made a pattern for my handles by going to Extras > Shape 1 then adjusting the measurements.

*Note about the Extras menu: The titles for the Extras options will display as greyed out, simply select the desired option below the titles to add a extra.

Here is my Garment Designer pattern for any users that would like to take a look:

Picnic Plate Carrier.gds

I printed out the .PDF and taped it together for reference.

The easiest way to make this would be out of 4-5mm thick felt like the original. However, finding a felt the width of the pattern in that thickness would have made this pricier than I would have liked.

I chose instead to use a thick chenille dot fabric and batting to pad the case. I did not have fusible batting available to me at the time, so I used regular batting and sandwiched it between the layers.

I found four buttons to sew on for the closures and also used buttonhole thread to attach them.

As always, it is important to make sure you have any and all notches marked.

I marked the notches for my handles about 3″ apart.

I also made sure to mark all four of my ‘snip’ lines as shown in the .PDF.

I will be be narrowly sewing around this line with a butthole stitch (.5 Stitch Length and width at 2 on my sewing machine) so that I can snip it and turn without any raw edges.

To make the handles, I cut 4 handle pieces and sewed them right sides together.

Then I turned them with my loop turner and sewed edge-stitched them together from the middle about 4 inches.

I pinned my handles at the notch marks and then sandwiched them between the right sides of my fabric.

I pinned my fabric right sides together with the batting touching the wrong side of the fabric.

I sewed around the edges leaving about a 4″ opening on one side so that I could turn it inside out. I also made sure to do a button stitch around the ‘snip’ lines as I went around.

Clipped and trimmed the corners before turning everything using the opening I left, then edge-stitched the perimeter to close.

Optonal: I had a box lying around so I cut a 12″ x 12″ piece, rolled it up slightly and stuck it inside before closing so that I had some stiffness at the bottom of the carrier.

Update: Cochenille User Diane had a very good suggestion(see comments below) to make this machine washable. She suggests using a piece of plastic canvas or a plastic report cover or notebook divider so that you can add stiffness to the pattern.

Then it was time to fold it on up!

I marked the 1.5″ mark that I had mapped out on my PDF for folding on all four corners, folded the corner down and started tacking through all the layers with my buttonhole thread. Then before I finished tacking, I added a button to cover up the tack mark.

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Another accessory complete! Good luck on your design challenge and please share them with us at info@cochenille.com

 

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