Basket Case: The Play-it-safe Case for Your Picnic Plates!

Patterning Using Garment Designer:

Accessory Challenge

This month’s Design Challenge is piggybacking off my last blog post about Fanny Packs. I had so much fun trying to create a new pattern using an existing Style Set that I thought other people would like to give it a try as well. Transforming the Flared Skirt Style Set into the Fanny Pack Pattern was a refreshing project to get me thinking outside of the box on what Garment Designer can do for me.

Challenge yourself with this fun project and try to think of a simple accessory you would like to make, then create it using Garment Designer! Make a purse, clutch, laptop case, etc. using a Garment Designer Style Set.

Summer is here! So for my next Style Set prest-o chang-o project I thought I would pattern this handy and dandy picnic plate case that Susan picked up during her travels to Italy:

After taking some measurements I drew out a schematic.

You can also download this and print it as a reference. The .PDF does not have any seam allowances added.

Picnic Basket CDS.pdf

Now that I had my schematic, I had to shop for a Style Set to suit my needs.

  • I knew I didn’t want to be fussing with curves so I wanted all straight lines in the style set.
  • I also knew I was going to pattern this as cut on the fold because a) I don’t like wasting paper b) it is a symmetrical pattern so I could.

Looking at half of my pattern, I counted how many points I would need for the pattern:

I picked the menu options that would give me straight lines: Top with a V-Neck and a Sleeve Cap.

I clicked once on the inside of the pattern to highlight my points, counted 6 (not including my center front) and I was good to go!

From here it was just a matter of moving the 6 points around until I was able to recreate my schematic.

You can see my center front is now the ‘cut on fold’ of my project.

I made a pattern for my handles by going to Extras > Shape 1 then adjusting the measurements.

*Note about the Extras menu: The titles for the Extras options will display as greyed out, simply select the desired option below the titles to add a extra.

Here is my Garment Designer pattern for any users that would like to take a look:

Picnic Plate Carrier.gds

I printed out the .PDF and taped it together for reference.

The easiest way to make this would be out of 4-5mm thick felt like the original. However, finding a felt the width of the pattern in that thickness would have made this pricier than I would have liked.

I chose instead to use a thick chenille dot fabric and batting to pad the case. I did not have fusible batting available to me at the time, so I used regular batting and sandwiched it between the layers.

I found four buttons to sew on for the closures and also used buttonhole thread to attach them.

As always, it is important to make sure you have any and all notches marked.

I marked the notches for my handles about 3″ apart.

I also made sure to mark all four of my ‘snip’ lines as shown in the .PDF.

I will be be narrowly sewing around this line with a butthole stitch (.5 Stitch Length and width at 2 on my sewing machine) so that I can snip it and turn without any raw edges.

To make the handles, I cut 4 handle pieces and sewed them right sides together.

Then I turned them with my loop turner and sewed edge-stitched them together from the middle about 4 inches.

I pinned my handles at the notch marks and then sandwiched them between the right sides of my fabric.

I pinned my fabric right sides together with the batting touching the wrong side of the fabric.

I sewed around the edges leaving about a 4″ opening on one side so that I could turn it inside out. I also made sure to do a button stitch around the ‘snip’ lines as I went around.

Clipped and trimmed the corners before turning everything using the opening I left, then edge-stitched the perimeter to close.

Optonal: I had a box lying around so I cut a 12″ x 12″ piece, rolled it up slightly and stuck it inside before closing so that I had some stiffness at the bottom of the carrier.

Update: Cochenille User Diane had a very good suggestion(see comments below) to make this machine washable. She suggests using a piece of plastic canvas or a plastic report cover or notebook divider so that you can add stiffness to the pattern.

Then it was time to fold it on up!

I marked the 1.5″ mark that I had mapped out on my PDF for folding on all four corners, folded the corner down and started tacking through all the layers with my buttonhole thread. Then before I finished tacking, I added a button to cover up the tack mark.

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Another accessory complete! Good luck on your design challenge and please share them with us at info@cochenille.com

 

April Cochenille Design Challenge

April Cochenille Design Challenge

Our April Cochenille Design Challenge will help you keep track of your USB Hasp key! USB Hasp keys are small, easy to tuck away and sometimes feel like they have chameleon-like qualities. Poor little thing; we think she just needs some ‘glam’

For April’s Cochenille Design Challenge let’s dress it up! We invite you to make a keychain that will make your HASP key strut her stuff. She will stand out, so you won’t be able to miss her (or him).

April Key Fob Keychain Challenge: Fab Your Key Fob

We know Cochenille software users are creative, so let’s make our key fobs fabulously fun!

Let your creativity shine so bright you cannot miss it. Make it flashy, furry, fun, fluorescent…anything you would like, but most importantly UNFORGETTABLE.

Submit images of your easy-to-find key fob to info@cochenille.com and be entered to win a gift certificate for Cochenille product. We will post all the entries and a winner will be chosen by May 5th.

We don’t require that you use our software to design your keychain, but kudos to those that do!

If you have a story to go along with your keychain, please feel free to share it with us.

We look forward to seeing your submissions. As the month progresses you can see our staff entries at: http://www.cochenille.com/cochenilleblog/

Happy Crafting from Cochenille!

info@cochenille.com

(858) 259-1698

February Design Challenge: Heart Accessory with Garment Designer

For this month’s design challenge, I have created a small heart-shaped coin purse via Garment Designer. Nothing gets me in the spirit for Valentine’s Day like some classic Sweetheart Candies. Perhaps not so much the taste of them, rather more the nostalgic visual appeal. Thus I used it as inspiration and made my heart coin purse in the image of a Sweetheart Candy.

To create my pattern in Garment Designer, I started by choosing a Top/Dress Hem Pocket under the Extras menu. Then I changed the style of the pocket to Rounded Square. This option gives you round points to manipulate in order to create the heart shape. Note that the round points are on the bottom, so you will be making this heart upside-down! First, move the bottom center point of the pocket upward to start creating the convex curves of the top of the heart. Next, move the two rounded curve points upward and pull the handles of the points down to continue creating the convex curves. (*See picture below.) Do your best to mimic the curve on one side to the other side of the heart. Finally, move the two top points of the pocket toward the center to create the bottom tip of the heart. Tweak until you achieve your personal heart-shaped preference. Once you are finished, add your seam allowance and only print the page(s) with your heart pattern.

                         

Now we are ready to create our design! I cut out two self pieces (pink), two linings, and two heavyweight Pellon stabilizers to help stiffen and strengthen my fabric. The only trim you will need is a zipper (my pattern fits a 7” zipper).

First I sewed the Pellon to each of my self pieces. On the front I decided to add a little embroidery to really get that Sweetheart Candy affect. I chose the “XOXO” candy as inspiration. To start the embroidery, I back stitched an outline of “XOXO”. I would recommend creating the backstitch in block lettering in order to make your statin stitches more consistent and easier to begin and end each stitch.

         

Once I was done with the embroidery, I was ready to sew the accessory together. First, I attached one heart self piece to the zipper. I choose to place my zipper centered on the bottom “V” of the heart. The trickiest part is the bottom point of the heart. Here, make small snips with your scissors on the zipper tape to allow it to spread open and create a nice curve. (*See picture above.) Do the same with the other self piece. Next, I sewed the remaining top heart curves of the self pieces right sides together. Because of the angles and shape of the heart, I decided it would be easier to hand stitch my lining into the purse. Frist, I machine sewed my lining right sides together on the top heart curves. Then I sewed it in at the zipper by hand using a pic stitch. This completes the Sweetheart coin purse! I absolutely adore it, but if I were to make it again I would add a small wrist strap.

I hope this post helps inspire your own creation for February’s design challenge and be sure to share it with us by emailing info@cochenille.com. Happy patterning and happy sewing!

Cochenille Design Studio Stitch Painter is all Uni-d

 

For my heart design project I wanted to make a cross stitch pattern using Stitch Painter. I chose something that makes my heart happy which would be…Unicorns! I found my prized pony in the land of Fantasia.

Then I made a vector using Adobe Illustrator and saved it as a PNG file. I wanted to use an 8″ loom to frame my cross stitch so I made an 8″ x 8″ box and centered and enlarged my image to the size I wanted.

Then I hit Ctrl + C and copied it into my clipboard.

I’m using 16 count Aida cloth so…

8″ x 16″ = 128

8″ x 16″ = 128

On Stitch Painter I set my document size as 128 x 128 and used an 8×8 grid.

I have the Full Color Import plug-in so I just selected the entire 128 x 128 grid using my Marquee tool and hit Ctrl + V to paste my PNG into Stitch painter.

I clicked and held the image to use the FCI plugin which resulted with this:

My palette had more colors than I wanted to work with so I started whittling down my colors.

I started combing the different swatches by clicking on colors in the Palette panel, and then pressing the ʻfʼ key (f for find) on the keyboard to see where they were and then

To see where a color swatch is used in the document, I clicked on the color in the Palette panel and then pressed the ʻfʼ key which would highlight them.

I combined the colors that were near each other in the document by clicking on the first color, then pressing and holding down the Command Key (Right Mouse button on Win).

I changed a few colors and then used the Clean Up Palette option from the Plug-ins menu.

To see how often I used a color I generated a key from the Plugins menu.

I added a blue major grid line by clicking on a blue color then selecting major grid from the Palette menu.

and now I have my pattern! I can print this off with my stitches and rows numbered on the printout by pressing the Opt key (or Alt key for Windows) when I select the print command in the File menu.

Happy hearts create happy art! Good luck with your own design challenge and be sure to share it with us by emailing us at info@cochenille.com

Garment Designer Software February Challenge: Hearts

Almost finished piece!

Susan, owner of Cochenille is sharing her heart-based design challenge. This is a Garment Designer software project. The inspiration for Susan’s project came from a store window in Italy. As you can see below, the sweater was uniquely different. So, photo time.. take a shot and file it away for another time.

Down the road a bit, Susan was embarking on a recycling project, and was looking for something to do, and remembered, not only her photo image, but also a garment she had purchased while taking a workshop with the Deco Belles in Napier New Zealand. Thus, you can see, this is becoming a global project.

 

The Inspiration

Inspiration sweater from a store window in Florence, Italy

And here is the sweater that became the candidate for reconstruction.

Original sweater, purchased in Napier, New Zealand in an Op Shop

The Pattern using Garment Designer Pattern Software

So, Susan developed a heart-shaped pattern in Garment Designer, and cut the pattern out of the original sweater, twice, once for the front and once for the back.

Sewing

To prevent the edges from fraying, the serger was used to finish the raw edges.

Serging the raw edges

Then, some of the original sweater was unraveled to obtain some yarn for crocheting around the edges.

Unraveling the original garment to obtain some yarn for finishing

Finishing

Here are a few shots of the crochet stitch going around the edges.

Crochet edging used to cover the served edges

And now.. the almost finished garment. Susan still wants to add another row of crochet, possibly in a coordinating fancier yarn… to be decided.

Almost finished piece!
Close-up of Front
Back view, arc of heart overlapping arc of heart. Modeled by Teresa, one of Cochenille’s staff.

So now fellow Cochenille users.. let’s see what you can do!

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